May 24, 2010
richardfuckingalpert:

alyssaroars:

(via deardarkness)
LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL RICHARD & MILES FUCKED!? WHAT!!??? bahahahaha.


That about sums it up.

richardfuckingalpert:

alyssaroars:

(via deardarkness)

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL RICHARD & MILES FUCKED!? WHAT!!??? bahahahaha.

That about sums it up.

hi-res

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Before I read anyone else’s thoughts…

There’s only one part I don’t understand at the moment—the rules of the sideways world, and why some people aren’t “ready” yet (like Ben! What was the deal with Ben?)—but altogether I am thoroughly satisfied with the episode, the conclusion and the entire conceit.

I long ago said to myself that when the end came, I’d either say “boy, that came out of nowhere,” or the total opposite “why didn’t I see that coming?” and I have to say the latter is true. It makes perfect sense, and the whole thing is based upon thoughts I had all the way back in season 2. Only I didn’t know yet what my realization meant.

Now I do, and I can’t be happier with the ending. Not because I was “right” all along, but because the show stuck to its guns and made the entire thing about the characters and their stories, from day one to the last.

Thanks LOST. To paraphrase Ben, this means more to me than I can put into words.

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May 23, 2010

richardfuckingalpert:

Driveshaft - You all everybody

LET THE EPIC PARTY BEGIN! 

Let it be said, this song isn’t very good. BUT: I’m 99.9% certain we’ll be hearing it tonight in some form.

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thelastdaysoflost:

alyssaroars:

lessthanair:lefay: panicman | futurisms | fakemustache | marinersubmariner:



Raiders of the Lost Ark / Lost
Dr. Jones, surely you don’t think you can escape from this island?




Seriously?, cant even deal with the awesomeness required to find these parallells!

Entirely coincidental. But also entirely awesome.

thelastdaysoflost:

alyssaroars:

lessthanair:lefaypanicman | futurisms | fakemustache | marinersubmariner:

Raiders of the Lost Ark / Lost

Dr. Jones, surely you don’t think you can escape from this island?

Seriously?, cant even deal with the awesomeness required to find these parallells!

Entirely coincidental. But also entirely awesome.

hi-res

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May 22, 2010
flashsideways:

What’s really going on.
(via predetermineddestiny)

Ha. Sawyer is shirtless.

flashsideways:

What’s really going on.

(via predetermineddestiny)

Ha. Sawyer is shirtless.

hi-res

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thedailywhat:

Jerrod Maruyama: “Kawaii LOST - Hurley and Smokey”
[flickr.]

Adorable

thedailywhat:

Jerrod Maruyama:Kawaii LOST - Hurley and Smokey

[flickr.]

Adorable

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…a year and a half ago, I did a long interview with Lindelof before season five started, and after we finished, we got to talking about the show in more general terms, and I went on some long rant about my dislike of Jack. Damon looked at me, a gleam in his eye, and said, “Okay, I accept that challenge. By the end of the series, I’m going to make you like Jack.” And I rolled my eyes at that, but damn it if he hasn’t lived up to that boast. If he can pull a reversal like that on one of my least favorite TV characters of all time, explaining the sideways universe and bringing an end to the series in roughly 100 minutes of story should be a piece of cake.
Alan Sepinwall, on why he trusts (and so should you) Damon, Carlton & the rest of LOST’s creative team to bring the series to a satisfying conclusion.
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In “The Man From Tallahassee,” the 13th episode of the third season of Lost, tropical shyster Benjamin Linus (Michael Emerson) conducts a mental exercise with island devotee John Locke (Terry O’Quinn). “Picture a box,” says Linus. “What if I told you that somewhere on this island, there’s a very large box, and whatever you imagined, whatever you wanted to be in it…when you opened that box, there it would be.” That scene is probably the most efficient summary of the whole of Lost. The epic series about a diverse group of damaged characters who wash up on a not-quite-deserted island has been a peerless, character-driven story, a riveting adventure, and a head-scratching sci-fi geekfest. But for all the things Lost was, the show was always measured by its potential: the engaging questions it raises and the mind-blowing answers they could yield. The obsession with Lost wasn’t about what it was, but what it could be.

Alston, making a plea for unanswered questions in the last episode of Lost. (via newsweek)

[Except, as I’ve pointed out before, the answers will never be as satisfying as the questions, which is why the show is bound to disappoint some people as it moves ever closer to the end. However, if you, like the castaways themselves, “let go” of your expectations, you’re much more apt to find the answers not only revealing, but exactly what they needed to be.]

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Greatness is found out on a limb

viafrank:

…you cannot suppress the worst tendencies of a show without suppressing its best, because they come from the same place. Put another way: you have to be willing to suck if you ever want to be great. “Awesome” and “awful” are actually closer to each other on the continuum of quality than either is to “meh.”

From an article by James Poniewozik about storytelling, television, arrogance, LOST, and Heroes. via robertogreco

The most daring (and polarizing) episodes of the series, “Exposé”, “Across the Sea” and “Ab Aeterno” are great examples of this philosophy. For the record, I loved them all.

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